Biden Designates Two New National Monuments, Including One Honoring Emmett Till

Emmett Till
FILE - This undated photo shows Emmett Louis Till, who was kidnapped, tortured and killed in the Mississippi Delta in August 1955 after witnesses claimed he whistled at a white woman working in a store. A cousin of Till filed a federal lawsuit on Feb. 7, 2023, seeking to compel the current Leflore County, Miss., sheriff, Ricky Banks, to serve an arrest warrant on Carolyn Bryant in the kidnapping that led to the brutal lynching of Till. She has since remarried and is named Carolyn Bryant Donham. In April 2023, Banks responded to the lawsuit by saying the arrest warrant is moot because a Mississippi grand jury declined to indict Donham in 2022; he also asked a judge to dismiss the suit. (AP Photo/File)

President Biden on Monday designated two new national monuments, including one honoring Emmett Till, the 14-year-old Black boy who was lynched in Mississippi in 1955.

The new Emmett Till National Monument will be located in Tallahatchie County, Mississippi, near where Till was abducted and killed. The monument will include the site of Till’s home, the bridge where he was abducted, and the Tallahatchie River where his body was found.

The other new national monument is the Avi Kwa Ame National Monument, which is located in the southern tip of Nevada. The monument spans 506,814 acres and is home to Spirit Mountain, a 5,963-foot peak that has spiritual or cultural significance to many Indigenous groups.

The designation of the two new national monuments is a significant step in honoring the legacies of Emmett Till and the Indigenous people of Nevada. The monuments will help to preserve these important places and tell their stories to future generations.

Here are some additional details about the two new national monuments:

  • Emmett Till National Monument:

The monument will be managed by the National Park Service. It will include a visitor center, educational exhibits, and hiking trails.

  • Avi Kwa Ame National Monument:

The monument will be managed by the Bureau of Land Management. It will include a number of hiking trails and opportunities for camping, fishing, and hunting.

The designation of the two new national monuments was met with praise from civil rights groups and Native American organizations. They said that the monuments would help to ensure that the legacies of Emmett Till and the Indigenous people of Nevada are never forgotten.

President Biden’s decision to designate the two new national monuments is a significant step in honoring the legacies of Emmett Till and the Indigenous people of Nevada. The monuments will help to preserve these important places and tell their stories to future generations.